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Polymers

Notes

From 03/18/2015 through 4/20/2012.

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Acrylics

Aminoplasts

Biopolymers

Conductive Polymers

Electroactive Polymers

Epoxies

Fluoropolymers

Graft Copolymers

Interpenetrating Networks (IPN)

Lignin

Liquid Crystal Polymers

Phenolics

Polyacetylene

Polyamides

Polycarbonates (PC)

Polychloroprenes

Polyelectrolytes

Polyesters

Polyethers

Polyethylenes (PE)

Polydienes

Polyimides

Polyisobutylene (PI)

Polyketones

Polylactic Acid (PLA)

Polymer Applications

Polymeric Additives

Polymerization

Polymer Melts

Polymer Morphology

Polynorbornene

Polyolefins

Polyoxymethylene (POM)

Polyrotaxanes

Polysilazanes

Polysilsesquioxanes (POSS)

Polystyrene (PS)

Polysulfones

Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)

Polythiophenes

Polyureas

Polyurethanes (PUR)

Silicones

Star Copolymers /Dendrites

Sulfur Resins

Supramolecular Polymers

Thermosets

Thermoplastic Elastomers

Unsaturated Polymers

Vinyls

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Notes

A polymer is a large molecule (macromolecule) composed of repeating structural units. These sub-units are typically connected by covalent chemical bonds. Although the term polymer is sometimes taken to refer to plastics, it actually encompasses a large class of compounds comprising both natural and synthetic materials with a wide variety of properties.

Because of the extraordinary range of properties of polymeric materials,[2] they play an essential and ubiquitous role in everyday life.[3] This role ranges from familiar synthetic plastics and elastomers to natural biopolymers such as nucleic acids and proteins that are essential for life.

Natural polymeric materials such as shellac, amber, and natural rubber have been used for centuries. A variety of other natural polymers exist, such as cellulose, which is the main constituent of wood and paper. The list of synthetic polymers includes synthetic rubber, Bakelite, neoprene, nylon, PVC, polystyrene, polyethylene, polypropylene, polyacrylonitrile, PVB, silicone, and many more.

Most commonly, the continuously linked backbone of a polymer used for the preparation of plastics consists mainly of carbon atoms. A simple example is polyethylene ('polythene' in British English), whose repeating unit is based on ethylene monomer. However, other structures do exist; for example, elements such as silicon form familiar materials such as silicones, examples being Silly Putty and waterproof plumbing sealant. Oxygen is also commonly present in polymer backbones, such as those of polyethylene glycol, polysaccharides (in glycosidic bonds), and DNA (in phosphodiester bonds).

Polymers are studied in the fields of polymer chemistry, polymer physics, and polymer science.

(Wikipedia, Polymers, 4/20/2012)

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These pages list the links as they are found.  Some will abstracted and added to Maro Topics. (RDC 2/7/2012)

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Roger D. Corneliussen
Editor
www.maropolymeronline.com

Maro Polymer Links
Tel: 610 363 9920
Fax: 610 363 9921
E-Mail: cornelrd@bee.net  

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Copyright 2012 by Roger D. Corneliussen.
No part of this transmission is to be duplicated in any manner or forwarded by electronic mail without the express written permission of Roger D. Corneliussen
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* Date of latest addition; date of first entry is 4/20/2012.

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