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Quantum Dot Applications

US Patent 8,895,072 (November 25, 2014), “Quantum Dot Barcode s\Structures and Uses thereof,” Hao Yan, Qiangbin Wang, and Yan Liu (Arizona State University, Scottsdale, Arizona, USA).

Fluorescently-labeled molecules for  have been used for a wide range of disease diagnostics and therapy However, there are many disadvantages to using an organic dye for these fluorescent-labeling systems.  Semiconducting quantum dots (QDs) have numerous advantages over organic dyes, such as high quantum yield, high molar extinction coefficients (.about.10-100.times. that of organic dyes), broad absorption with narrow, symmetric photoluminescence (PL) spectra (full-width at half-maximum .about.25-40 nm) panning the UV to near-infrared, large effective Stokes shifts, high resistance to photobleaching and exceptional resistance to photo- and chemical degradation.  However, embedding does not permit precise control of QD position in the bead; thus the embedded QDs can aggregate and couple with each other inside the beads, which could cause spectral broadening, wavelength shifting, and/or energy transfer.

Yan, Wang, and Liu of Arizona State University developed a microstructure containing a core  and multiple layers containing quantum dots and spacer layers.   The result is a multiplex detection system based on the unique barcode associated with each microstructure. The layers form a unique barcode for identifying molecules.  Aggregation is prevented by the spacer layers.  These barcodes can be used in flow cytometry systems, diagnostic libraries, combinatorial libraries, fluorescent inks, or fluorescent cosmetics.

The "quantum dot" (QD) is a semiconducting photoluminescent material, such as CdS quantum dots, CdSe quantum dots, CdSe@CdS core/shell quantum dots, CdSe@ZnS core/shell quantum dots, CdTe quantum dots, PbS quantum dots, and/or PbSe quantum dots.  Each quantum dot containing layer comprises a single type of quantum dot of a specific emission color.  These quantum dots are embedded in polymer layers such as polystyrene, poly (methyl methacrylate), polyhydroxyalkanoate, polylactide, or their co-polymers.  The same polymers without the quantum dots form the spacer layers preventing interactions between the quantum dot layers.  The layers can be 10 to 500 nm thick.  The number of quantum dot layers are 2 to 10 or more.  The  ratio of fluorescent intensities for each assemble is the barcode of the assembly.  A core template is developed and the layers deposited by a combination of quantum dot surface chemistry and sol-chemistry. 

8,895,072 
Quantum dot barcode structures and uses thereof 

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Interested!!
Bookmark this page to follow future developments!.
(RDC 7/16/2012)

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Roger D. Corneliussen
Editor
www.maropolymeronline.com

Maro Polymer Links
Tel: 610 363 9920
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E-Mail: cornelrd@bee.net  

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